Embroidery Workshop with Katie Martin of Harvest Goods

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Embroidery Workshop with Katie Martin of Harvest Goods

When: Saturday, September 28th

Hours: 11 am to 2 pm 

Where: Studio Carta, 501 Heath Street, Suite 2, Chestnut Hill, MA. 

Join Katie Martin of Harvest Goods Co. for an embroidery class suitable for any skill level. In this class, you'll learn Katie’s comprehensive process for creating a beautiful finished piece of embroidered art. The class will feature some of Studio Carta’s exquisite scissors, metallic threads, and ribbon, ensuring a high-quality and enjoyable experience for all participants.

Espresso and Italian chocolates are complimentary during the workshop. Additionally, students will receive a 10% discount on the entire Studio Carta collection, available both before and after the workshop.

Katie, who will be traveling from Arkansas to teach the workshop, will also be selling her exclusive line of embroidery kits during the session.

Brief History of Embroidery:

Embroidery, the art of embellishing fabric or other materials using a needle to apply thread or yarn, has a rich and diverse history. This craft, in various forms, has existed since the production of fabric. While practiced across the world, its origin is commonly associated with China and the Near East, dating back to the 5th century B.C. Early forms of embroidery can also be traced back to Cro-Magnon days around 30,000 B.C., showing that primitive humankind discovered the stitches used to join animal skins together could also be used for embellishment. Archaeological discoveries from this time period include fossilized remains of heavily hand-stitched and decorated clothing.

During the Viking Age, around the 9th and 10th centuries, early examples of embroidery have been found in Sweden. The craft really began to flourish in Europe with the rise of the Christian church and monarchy around the year 1000. Intricately embellished garments, tapestries, and tablecloths became important symbols of power and wealth. This trend was not limited to Europe. In Medieval Islamic societies, embroidery was a sign of high social status in Muslim communities. In 18th century England and its colonies, embroidery marked a girl’s passage into womanhood and was indicative of her social standing.

The Industrial Revolution brought significant changes to the world of embroidery with the development of machine embroidery. This advancement rendered the societal and gender stigmas associated with this hand-craft no longer relevant, allowing embroidery to be appreciated purely as an art form.

Embroidery Workshop with Katie Martin of Harvest Goods

When: Saturday, September 28th

Hours: 11 am to 2 pm 

Where: Studio Carta, 501 Heath Street, Suite 2, Chestnut Hill, MA. 

Join Katie Martin of Harvest Goods Co. for an embroidery class suitable for any skill level. In this class, you'll learn Katie’s comprehensive process for creating a beautiful finished piece of embroidered art. The class will feature some of Studio Carta’s exquisite scissors, metallic threads, and ribbon, ensuring a high-quality and enjoyable experience for all participants.

Espresso and Italian chocolates are complimentary during the workshop. Additionally, students will receive a 10% discount on the entire Studio Carta collection, available both before and after the workshop.

Katie, who will be traveling from Arkansas to teach the workshop, will also be selling her exclusive line of embroidery kits during the session.

Brief History of Embroidery:

Embroidery, the art of embellishing fabric or other materials using a needle to apply thread or yarn, has a rich and diverse history. This craft, in various forms, has existed since the production of fabric. While practiced across the world, its origin is commonly associated with China and the Near East, dating back to the 5th century B.C. Early forms of embroidery can also be traced back to Cro-Magnon days around 30,000 B.C., showing that primitive humankind discovered the stitches used to join animal skins together could also be used for embellishment. Archaeological discoveries from this time period include fossilized remains of heavily hand-stitched and decorated clothing.

During the Viking Age, around the 9th and 10th centuries, early examples of embroidery have been found in Sweden. The craft really began to flourish in Europe with the rise of the Christian church and monarchy around the year 1000. Intricately embellished garments, tapestries, and tablecloths became important symbols of power and wealth. This trend was not limited to Europe. In Medieval Islamic societies, embroidery was a sign of high social status in Muslim communities. In 18th century England and its colonies, embroidery marked a girl’s passage into womanhood and was indicative of her social standing.

The Industrial Revolution brought significant changes to the world of embroidery with the development of machine embroidery. This advancement rendered the societal and gender stigmas associated with this hand-craft no longer relevant, allowing embroidery to be appreciated purely as an art form.

Requests for returns and exchanges must be submitted by phone or email within one week of delivery. All merchandise must be returned unopened, unused, and in its original packaging. A refund will be issued after we have received the merchandise. Shipping costs are not refundable.

Elegantly crafted with history in every product.

Studio Carta products use materials and practices that date back to 19th century Italy—all from our collaborative studio in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts.

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